Avoid Monkey Jumping to and from Association Software

995c4a1bb2dbfbe506e4533e19987ae1Thanksgiving is behind us, which can only mean one thing — our pants are a little tighter having just “Gobble Wobbled” home from grandma’s house.

And so begins the holiday season!  CHEERS!

‘Tis a season marked by damp weather, muddy feet and a community sentiment that one must buy thoughtful gifts for family or, depending on your circumstances, unthoughtful purchases for the group of circus animals who have become like family to you.

Wow, who would ever make an unnecessary or unthoughtful purchase?!?  – GASP!

Remind you of anyone?  {Clears throat}

Yep, you guessed it! –if you’re an association or non-profit executive, it’s possible we are describing YOU!

If you’ve ever been charged with the daunting task of selecting software and services for your organization, then you’ve undoubtedly fallen into the pitfall of purchasing a system you need or want but don’t truly understand.

It starts innocently enough. You’ve budgeted for a new nonprofit database management system but realize by calendar-end that time is running out. So, you panic!

In your haste, you (1) buy something you don’t understand simply because it “seemed” the most reasonably priced (seemed being the operative word here) or, (2) purchase a system because it was the most familiar.

REASONABLY PRICED:

Buying a database management system, or any solution, because it seems like a bargain, is about as wise as buying a model home because you like the way it looks. It’s only after you move in that you realize that without paying for the upgrades, your new home has no flooring, no granite counter-tops and in order to access the community pool, you’ll have to pay an extra entry fee.  Eeks!

HINT: Know what you’re getting from day one so there are no hidden financial surprises later on for you to operate your association the way you want to operate it for the next seven to ten years.

A PURCHASE OF FAMILIARITY:

What’s worse than purchasing something because it seems like a bargain? The greater consumer trap of buying something because “You’ve used something like it before.”

In the world of dating, one of our employees refers to this approach as “Monkey Jumping,” but it’s still applicable here:

Monkey jumping is the art of swinging backwards to grab hold of a familiar branch/relationship with one hand while still holding tightly to the current relationship, or data management system in this case, in the other.

You know the system you have isn’t working for your association’s needs and hasn’t been for some time now.  You want something new but you’re not quite ready to say goodbye to the system you have.  Thus, monkey jumpers, or over-lappers, will stay with what they have (or whom) until they can find a substitute to swing towards. They reach for something new, but in my experience, they will often reach back to grab onto the branch they most recently released because it’s safe and familiar.

HINT: You know you’re a monkey jumper if you have more than one data management system in your association and you’re not fully committed or engaged with either one of them.

Sigh.

It’s simple: Consumers recognize a problem based on physical cues, stimulus responses or a need. For example, when you smell fresh bread, you realize you’re hungry.

All we are suggesting is that the next time you’re hungry for a new system or solution, and tempted to hastily settle or swing back towards something that won’t meet all your association needs, head instead to a bakery that will provide you with the greatest selection of products and satisfy your insatiable appetite for the long-haul.

HINT: By “bakery” here we mean a solution partner like enSYNC who can point you in the right direction and make your “bread” go further the next time you select a system  for your non-profit or association.

If you are interested in discussing this concept or need help before your next jump, please contact us.

Special Thanks to Author:

Debbie J. Smith, Customer Improvement Specialist, enSYNC Corporation

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